How to Move Out of Your Parents’ House

It’s finally time for you to leave the nest and spread your wings out on your own in the big world. You’ve saved enough to sustain yourself, you have a steady job or you’re moving for school; whatever the reason, you’re going to be moving out. But how do you move out of your parents’ house? Before you cram your things into boxes and wave goodbye, take a deep breath and be sure you’re not forgetting anything. 

It’s normal to be emotional during the experience. Being overly excited could cause you to leave precious items or childhood memories behind, which could be lost during your parents’ next spring cleaning session or when they move into a smaller home. Your parents may also be sad about becoming empty nesters, so don’t be in too much of a hurry to get out of the door. 

Before you pack things into your car, mentally prepare yourself and your parents for what is to come. If it’s your first time being on your own, it can be an exhilarating and terrifying experience. You’ll finally have your own space, be responsible for your own mess and security, and be paying your own bills. Try out a free budgeting service before you move so you can track expenses and learn how to live within your means.

When it comes to your parents, gauge their reactions and speak appropriately. Chances are, they’ll be excited for you, but sad to see you go. Try not to make any demands of them; always ask if you need help and accept if the answer is no. 

Once you’re mentally prepared, it’s time to figure out what stays and what goes. 

Deciding What To Pack

If your new place comes furnished, you have an easy job. Clothing, towels, kitchenware such as dishes, utensils and small appliances, and toiletry items are the essentials. Knicknacks is where packing gets tricky. 

Be sure to go through all of your items and donate or get rid of things that don’t have any use and have no sentimental value attached to them. They add clutter and take up room in the moving boxes, which adds time and, potentially, more expenses, to your move. 

You’ll want your new place to be decorated in a way that makes you feel comfortable and happy. Taking a few prized possessions along can help with that and are also great talking points for visitors. But which ones should you consider taking and which ones should you ask your parents to keep?

Trophies, Badges and Formal Wear

These are highly sentimental to a lot of people, but take up a lot of shelf space. They embody memories, achievement and character-shaping moments. If you don’t take these with you, be sure you ask your parents to hold onto them until you have more room to store them. If they are special to you, such as a wedding dress, don’t leave it behind. 

Photographs, Scrapbooks, and Yearbooks

You can’t get more personal than photographs. While having hardcopies of memories feels obsolete in today’s digital age, they are the best way to relive memories and turn a new place into a home. Take inventory of your photos and bring all of them that take you back to a special moment, allow you to remember a close friend, or just bring you joy looking at. Consider framing and hanging them too in your new home. 

Scrapbooks and yearbooks are important memories as well, but if you don’t have the storage space for them, it may be best to leave them behind. Have your parents hang onto them for your. Chances are, they won’t want to part with these memories either. 

Keep your baby book too. Your parents will make sure it stays safe if you can’t take it with you right away. 

Childhood Items

If you have any beloved toys from your childhood, you may not be ready to leave them behind. That’s okay! The childhood bond you have with your favorite stuffed animal, action figure, ball, or toy can never be replicated. Take a couple items that are important to you and consider donating the rest. 

You can also look to store them in self storage, in your basement or attic, or keep them with your parents until further notice. These are prime targets for your parents to donate during spring cleaning, so be sure to mark the box “do not donate” if you do not wish to part with your childhood items just yet. 

Artwork, Music or Awards

Pack only your favorite of each. Most music is digital, though if you have a record collection, consider the space you have available before you pack them up. If you’re moving into a dorm room, you may want to leave those behind until you have a larger and more secure place of living. 

Artwork should be treated similarly. If you have room for it, great! If not, leave it behind or donate it. Look at how it is displayed too. If you can’t use a nail or drill to hang it in your new home, consider leaving it behind until you can get a place where you can display it. 

Awards, such as things you’ve won at school or work, should be kept for sentimental value. Your future self will thank you for it. 

You’re All Packed!

Everything is in boxes and labeled and you’re ready to say your final goodbyes to your childhood room and your parents. Look around one more time before you do. If you’re sure you have everything and all of your possessions can fit inside of your new home, then you have nothing holding you back. 

If you’re moving, but don’t have room for your couch, childhood toys or boxes, consider looking into self storage. Albuquerque Self Storage can provide an easy to access and secure unit to store anything you need. Contact them today to see their availability. 

The final step is to load everything into your car or moving truck and hit the road. If you’re using your car, remember to protect the interior and secure everything before pulling out of your driveway. If you’re renting a truck, pack the heavy things in the back and the essentials up front.

Movers will know what they’re doing, so do your research to hire the best moving company in your area. 

Good luck on your move from your friends at Albuquerque Self Storage.